Working for People with Sight Loss

Disability Access & Awareness

NCBI has the expertise to guide and train individuals and companies on how to make their environment more accessible to the needs of people who are blind or vision impaired.
man walking with cane into outdoor food sign

 

1 – Making Buildings and Streets Accessible

NCBI is actively involved in several committees and groups to promote good practice regarding access to buildings and streets for people who are blind and vision impaired. Our staff and advocates work closely with county councils, providing advice in relation to road crossings, tactile paving, street furniture and signage.

There are several features in the built environment that help people with vision impairment to go about their daily lives safely and independently. These include:

  • Audible signals at traffic lights,
  • Tactile paving to indicate crossings,
  • Street furniture which contrasts visibly with the background and
  • Audible announcements on public transport.

Our Access Audits provide advice to public and private organisations on ways to make buildings, streets, and public transport accessible for people with vision impairment.

We also provide Awareness Training for both public and private organisations.

NCBI has qualified Access Workers in our offices around the country who would be more than happy to answer any queries you may have in your local area.

2 – Awareness Training

NCBI is committed to raising awareness of vision impairment. The greatest way to increase fair and equal treatment of people with impaired vision is through understanding. By raising awareness and explaining issues relating to vision impairment, we aim to remove the barriers to full participation in all areas of life which are currently faced by people who are blind and vision impaired.

More and more organisations realise that their buildings, services and information should be accessible to people with disabilities. While this is partly because of the Disability Act 2005 and Equal Status Acts 2000-2018, public and private organisations are also realising that people who access their services also need to be included.

The aim of awareness training is to remove some of the communication, attitudinal and physical barriers that prevent people who are blind and vision impaired from fully participating in society.

It is also important to make information accessible to people who are blind and vision impaired.

Our Library & Media Centre  is more than happy to offer you more advice.

3 – Access Audits

Access audit of your building

An accessibility assessment of your building by one of our qualified Access Auditors can inform you of features will enable you to make changes so that people with vision impairment to use the building safely and independently. We can advise you of improvements which may be needed. These include advice on good signage, good lighting, effective use of colour and provision of suitable markings around steps and stairs.

Access audit of streets

Accessibility should be considered in the planning and design stage of streets to ensure that people who are blind and vision impaired can move around safely and independently. Our advocates and staff are actively involved in groups and committees to promote good practice regarding access to public spaces and the external environment. We work closely with county councils, providing advice in relation to road crossings, tactile paving, street furniture and signage for example.

Public transport

Public transport is often the only means of transport that people with vision impairment use independently to get to where they need to go, so it is vital that accessibility is a key consideration.

We can provide information and advice on for example on audible announcements on trains, buses and trams, the use of accessible LCD displays at stations, on trains and trams and clear and effective signage.

For more information contact us at:
Tel: 01 830 70 33
Email: [email protected]